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❶They can start the course at anytime after that. You and your students will have fun comparing their responses and seeing how the students and the responses have changed.

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As long as your child has easy access to the supplies she needs, the kitchen or dining-room table might be ideal. There are three reasonable time periods during which kids can do their homework: Figure out a time that suits your child and your family, and then stick with it. Before bed is the only time Dr. Cooper advises against doing homework , because kids wind up going to sleep later than they should.

Kids find all sorts of reasons to avoid doing their work, so you need to anticipate them. To start off on the right note, you might say, "Once homework starts, there are no breaks, so go to the bathroom and get your snack now.

Jamie and I used to spend ten minutes going back and forth about what the teacher "really meant" in her assignment. If your child is regularly unsure about the assignments, talk to the teacher. Your child should do his homework mostly without your help. Experts agree that being nearby is great, but being on top of your child is not. When you use our service, you are placing your confidence in us which is why we would like to inform you that all our benefits are free of charge!

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We are industry top leading Essay writing services in US. Contact with us if you are searching for top quality Essay solution in affordable price. Order Now Live Chat Support. Get Your Discount Now! Check It Out Now. Help For Homework Hassles helpHomework time is dreaded by many families. Children come home…Dont waste your time on ace my homework. Ask your question here! School Solver is a marketplace for students to get help with homework questions,.. Help for Homework Hassles! Reinforce that idea by repeating this game throughout the year.

Danielle Weston, Willard School, Sanford, Maine Hands-On Activity Have students begin this activity by listing at least 25 words that describe them and the things they like. No sentences allowed, just words! Then ask each student to use a dark pen to trace the pattern of his or her hand with the fingers spread apart. Provide another sheet of paper that the student can place on top of the tracing. Because the tracing was done with a dark pen, the outline should be visible on the sheet below. Direct students to use the outlines as guides and to write their words around it.

Provide students a variety of different colored pencils or markers to use as they write. Then invite students to share their work with the class. They might cut out the hand outlines and mount them on construction paper so you can display the hands for open house.

Then provide each student with five different-colored paper strips. Have each student write a different talent on separate paper strips, then create a mini paper chain with the strips by linking the five talents together.

As students complete their mini chains, use extra strips of paper to link the mini chains together to create one long class chain. Have students stand and hold the growing chain as you link the pieces together. Once the entire chain is constructed and linked, lead a discussion about what the chain demonstrates -- for example, all the students have talents; all the students have things they do well; together, the students have many talents; if they work together, classmates can accomplish anything; the class is stronger when students work together than when individual students work on their own.

Hang the chain in the room as a constant reminder to students of the talents they possess and the benefits of teamwork. Your school librarian might have a discard pile you can draw from. Invite students to search through the magazines for pictures, words, or anything else that might be used to describe them. Have students cut out their silhouettes, then fill them with a collage of pictures and words that express their identity. Then give each student an opportunity to share his or her silhouette with the group and talk about why he or she chose some of the elements in the collage.

Post the silhouettes to create a sense of "our homeroom. You can use such cards to gather other information too, such as school schedule, why the student signed up for the class, whether the student has a part-time job, and whether he or she has access to the Internet at home.

As a final bit of information, ask the student to write a headline that best describes him or her! This headline might be a quote, a familiar expression, or anything else. When students finish filling out the cards, give a little quiz. Then read aloud the headlines one at a time. Ask students to write the name of the person they think each headline best describes. Who got the highest score? It seems as if parents are contacted only if there is a problem with students.

At the end of each grading period, use the home address information to send a postcard to a handful of parents to inform them about how well their child is doing. This might take a little time, but it is greatly appreciated! Pop Quiz Ahead of time, write a series of getting-to-know-you questions on slips of paper -- one question to a slip.

You can repeat some of the questions. Then fold up the slips, and tuck each slip inside a different balloon. Blow up the balloons.

Give each student a balloon, and let students take turns popping their balloons and answering the questions inside.

Contributor Unknown Fact or Fib? Tell students that you are going to share some information about yourself. Suggest that students take notes; as you speak, they should record what they think are the most important facts you share. When you finish your presentation, tell students that you are going to tell five things about yourself. Four of your statements should tell things that are true and that were part of your presentation; one of the five statements is a total fib.

This activity is most fun if some of the true facts are some of the most surprising things about you and if the "fib" sounds like something that could very well be true. Tell students they may refer to their notes to tell which statement is the fib. Next, invite each student to create a biography and a list of five statements -- four facts and one fib -- about himself or herself. Mitzi Geffen Circular Fact or Fib? Organize students into two groups of equal size. One group forms a circle equally spaced around the perimeter of the classroom.

There will be quite a bit of space between students. The other group of students forms a circle inside the first circle; each student faces one of the students in the first group.

Give the facing pairs of students two minutes to share their second oral "biographies. After each pair completes the activity, the students on the inside circle move clockwise to face the next student in the outer circle. Students in the outer circle remain stationary throughout the activity. When all students have had an opportunity to share their biographies with one another, ask students to take turns each sharing facts and fibs with the class. The other students refer to their notes or try to recall which fact is really a fib.

Contributor Unknown People Poems Have each child use the letters in his or her name to create an acrostic poem. Tell students they must include words that tell something about themselves -- for example, something they like to do or a personality or physical trait. Invite students to share their poems with the class. This activity is a fun one that enables you to learn how your students view themselves. Allow older students to use a dictionary or thesaurus.

Bill Laubenberg Another Poetic Introduction. Ask students to use the form below to create poems that describe them. This activity lends itself to being done at the beginning of the school year and again at the end of the year.

You and your students will have fun comparing their responses and seeing how the students and the responses have changed. Contributor Unknown Food for Thought To get to know students and to help them get to know one another, have each student state his or her name and a favorite food that begins with the same first letter as the name. Watch out -- it gets tricky for the last person who has to recite all the names and foods!

Send students into the school hallways or schoolyard, and ask each to find something that "is completely the opposite of yourself. To widen the area to be explored, provide this activity as homework on the first night of school. When students bring their items back to class, ask each to describe why the item is not like him or her. But you might also get some clever responses, such as the one from a young man who brought in the flip-top from a discarded can; he talked about its decaying outward appearance and its inability to serve a purpose without being manipulated by some other force and how he was able to serve a purpose on his own.

Joy Ross Personal Boxes In this activity, each student selects a container of a reasonable size that represents some aspect of his or her personality or personal interests, such as a football helmet or a saucepan. Ask students to fill that object with other items that represent themselves -- for example, family photos, CDs, dirty socks, a ballet shoe -- and bring their containers back to school.

Students can use the objects in the containers as props for three-minute presentations about themselves. As each student gives a presentation, you might write a brief thank-you note that mentions something specific about the presentation so that each student can take home a special note to share with parents. It might take a few days to give every student the opportunity to share. Getting to Know One Another Volume 2: My Classmates and Me Volume 4: Activities for the First Day of School Volume Back-to-School Activities Volume 5:

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Help for Homework Hassles! Working, caring for siblings after school, participating in extra-curricular activities, watching TV -- all of those things compete with homework for students' after-school time.

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a guest post by Tracy McConaghie, LCSW, RPT/S ivinete.cf Homework time is dreaded by many families. Children come home.

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